123 Street, NYC, US 0123456789 info@example.com

game

Ligaz11 Review of Comp City

 

 

 

One of the first things that first time visitors to Las Vegas notice is that some folks at the casino get much better treatment than they do. Most people assume that one would have to be a high roller to get free food, free rooms, and limo rides to the airport. Max Rubin tells us in Comp City that it isn’t necessary to let the casino have a shot at a big bankroll to do this, but it is necessary to make the casino think they will.

 

If The Frugal Gambler tells the reader how to take advantage of high expectation situations (expecting to win or lose just a little) in order to get free trips to the buffet, free weekday rooms, or small amounts of cash back, Comp City deals with the other extreme, giving the illusion of a large amount of blackjack action in order to secure RFB (room, food, beverage), airfare reimbursement, and all the other top level perks that come to the casinos’ favorite customers.

 

My guess is even someone skilled in playing this game will learn a considerable amount from this book. There are a lot of tips and techniques on how to maximize the casino’s perception of how much is being wagered while minimizing risk. Some of the suggestions probably won’t work quite as well today as they did when the book was written, still, there are some powerful methods for those who care to play at this level.

 

One interesting observation I made were the places where techniques were similar and dissimilar to those used by blackjack card counters. The card counter wants to not be noticed by the pit, the comp counter wants to be noticed only at key times. The card counter wants a fast …